Shooting Australia is looking to fill the role of High Performance Coordinator (HPC – Para). The Para program will be a focus for this new position whose key tasks will include:

  • Planning and coordination of the Para program and its key activities (e.g. national camps);
  • Organisation of logistics associated with Para athletes’ engagement in international competition (e.g. travel, accommodation, permits, etc.);
  • Facilitating SA’s approach to Para-Shooting TID in conjunction with SA’s coaches and other relevant stakeholders (e.g. the APC); and
  • Maintaining regular communication with Para-Shooting athletes, officials and key stakeholders in the Para National Program.

Please find here the job description.



“The National Development Coach will work closely with PA’s Club, Competition and Advanced level coaches to ensure that targeted ISSF athletes who are members of PA’s National Development Squad are appropriately challenged and supported to continue their development in their home daily training environments”

Find out more HERE


In a balanced match to close the action-packed third day of competition at the Shooting Sport Centre in Suhl (GER) Australian team Nathan Steven Argiro (19) and Alexis Elsa Preston (17) took silver in the Trap Mixed Team Junior at the ISSF Junior World Cup, coming second to Italy’s Teo Petroni (20) and Erica Sessa (19)–who also placed 1st at this year’s Junior World Cup in Sydney.

Between June 22nd and June 29th the German city is hosting the second ISSF Junior World Cup of the season.

A total of 761 junior athletes are participating in the competition, representing 61 National Olympic Committees and piling up a total of 1544 starts, the greatest number of participants yet for an ISSF Junior World Cup.

For the Trap Mixed Team Junior complete results click here.

 

Photo: Nicolò Zangirolami


Shooting Australia will be undertaking a review of the Performance Series and is assembling a working group comprising of community, athletes, officials, staff, venues, and High Performance representatives to reassess the current Performance Series. This may result in a complete overhaul of the Performance Series or some minor or major amendments. However, as not everyone can be part of the Working Group Shooting Australia invites members of our community to have your say by making a Submission. Shooting Australia is calling for submissions from our community, Member Bodies, State Associations, Clubs, and Athletes via email to [email protected] regarding the current Performance Series and domestic events looking at future delivery options.

Please make sure the feedback you provide is carefully considered and can be used to inform the Working Group. When having your say, it is important to be clear on the solutions and ideas you formulate. In developing your submission you should ask yourself questions like:

  • What do I want to see happen with elite domestic events in Australia?
  • What do I think is good about what is currently being delivered?
  • Where do I think changes could be made to improve current domestic competitions/events/series?
  • What could a premiere domestic competition series or event look like?

Writing a submission presents an opportunity for you to share your local knowledge and experience with us. It is important to have a clear message that we can respond to, and it is important to be realistic.

In anticipation of your response thank you for your time.

Kelly Wright
Head of Marketing – Shooting Australia


Reflection on National Come And Try May

The last 6 months or more have been an amazing ride with everyone enthusiastic about working together to develop a national campaign. From the SA Board, the Member Body support, State Associations, and most importantly the Clubs. Everyone has played their part in what we have achieved and we should be proud of what we’ve accomplished in year one.

Here are some quick stats;
• 120 clubs
• 1274 National Come And Try May participants
• 1578 Activation Zone participants at the Commonwealth Games
• Newscorp papers
– Average readership – 2,945,000
– Total reach – 7,772,000
• Newscorp digital
– 102,686 impressions
• Facebook ads
– 76,521 impressions
– 57,696 reach (how many unique people who received impressions)
• Google Ads
– 58,435 impressions
• Facebook posts
– 20 posts
– 64,838 reach
– 7,006 views
– 1820 comments/likes/shares
• Instagram posts
– 90 followers
– 18 posts
– 290 likes
– 19 comments

This has been more than a membership drive, although that has definitely been one of the many positive outcomes for the sport. We’ve worked together, with one voice, nationwide, we’ve said come and try our sport, we’re really proud of who we are and what our sport is about and if you give it a try you’ll understand and most likely be hooked too!

During this event we’ve had some of the oldest shooting clubs in the world engaging people, we’ve had small regional clubs grow their membership by 50%. We’ve broken down barriers with members of local government, state government MP’s, and Federal Ministers.

You’ve begun conversations in some of the highest offices in the land, you’ve unlocked conversations about how to access funding opportunities, you’ve had radio, print media, and television coverage around the country.

While the numbers are important, they don’t tell the whole story of the impact that you have all made within your communities, and together across the country. Sometimes it might feel like it’s just you and your gun, or even your club. This is a great opportunity for us all to step back, and look at what we have achieved collectively in this first year of National Come And Try May.

Take a moment, pat yourselves on the back…

Then hold a spot in your calendar for May 2019 as we do it all again.

You can register for 2019 here.

I’ll be on leave now for the next 3 weeks, a full report will be available shortly after my return.

Thanks again to all for their contributions big or small. You’ve each made a meaningful impact on the growth of the sport, the understanding created in the community, we can be proud of what we have achieved together.


Seventh edition of the Shooting Para Sport Worlds heads to Australia

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Coming off the back of a successful 2018 World Championships in Cheongju, South Korea, World Shooting Para Sport has revealed the host of the 2019 edition.

Sydney, Australia, is next in line to welcome the top shooters from around the world next October, with detailed competition dates to be announced.

The 2019 World Championships aligns with the change to odd-year Championships, as the previous six editions were held every four years in between Paralympic Games. It will be organised by Shooting Australia.

The competition will take place with under a year before the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics, and will be the international federation’s largest quota allocation event for those upcoming Games.

Additionally, the 2019 Worlds will see the first shooting Para sport event to combine rifle, pistol and the newly-added Para trap disciplines. Only a year ago, the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) approved Para trap as an official discipline under World Shooting Para Sport.

Tyler Anderson, World Shooting Para Sport Manager said: “After a successful event in Cheongju, we now turn our sights to the 2019 World Shooting Para Sport Championships to take place in Sydney, Australia. This is planned to be our most marquee event ever outside of the Paralympic Games with our new World Championships structure, and it carries great significance with less than a year before the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

“The Sydney International Shooting Centre and Shooting Australia have an excellent reputation for hosting world-class events. With a newly renovated venue and experienced staff, we are thrilled to offer 54 quotas and 54 chances for athletes to chase their Paralympic dream.”

Damien Marangon, Chief Executive Officer of Shooting Australia, said: “We are delighted to have been awarded the Sydney 2019 World Shooting Para Sport Championships.

“This is a critical event in the lead up to the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics. We look forward to delivering a world-class event and to welcoming our shooting Para sport friends and family from across the globe to what promises to be an amazing event.

“We’ve got a great venue, a great location and we can’t wait to host the World Championships here in 2019.

“We’re really excited and lucky to have been at the 2018 World Championships in Cheongju, and we learned a lot. They did a great job just in terms of how smooth it went and other areas such as transport, and we were there to take away some things that could make our World Championships even better.”

Australia saw success in Cheongju with team silver in the R3 (mixed 10m air rifle prone SH1).

Sydney held a World Cup in September 2015, which provided direct quota allocations to the Rio 2016 Paralympics, and the 2019 Worlds will be held in a newly-renovated shooting range used during the Sydney 2000 Paralympics.

Original story linked here can be found on World Shooting Para Sport.


The 28-year-old Aussie took the first World Cup medal of her career in Changwon (KOR), prevailing over People’s Republic of China’s Lin Yuemei after two thrilling shoot-off series. Yao Yushi, also of the People’s Republic of China, took bronze.

The second competition day at the ISSF World Cup Stage 2 in Changwon (KOR) opened with an exciting final in the 25m Pistol Women event, as Australia’s Elena Galiabovitch took her first World Cup medal after a spectacular duel with People’s Republic of China’s Lin Yuemei.

In fact, after they both concluded the match with 34 hits, Galiabovitch and Lin had to go through a shoot-off to determine the gold and the silver medalist, both scoring 2 hits in their first additional round and winning the applause of a packed finals hall. In the second, decisive tie-breaker, then, the Australian 28-year-old prevailed with 3 hits against 2, pocketing the gold medal and adding it the silver she won on April 10th at the 2018 Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast (AUS).

The ISSF World Cup Stage 2 in Changwon will continue tomorrow with three more finals: the 25m Pistol Women, taking place at 11:30 pm (UTC+9:00), the 10m Air Rifle Mixed Team, scheduled at 1:45 pm, and the Trap Women, taking place at 4:15 pm.

The original article by Marco Vettoretti can be found here

Photo: Nicolò Zangirolami


BRISBANE – Australia’s Laetisha SCANLAN celebrated her 28th birthday in the best possible way, winning a title in the women’s trap at the Belmont Shooting Centre on Friday 13 April.

The qualification eliminated some high-profile contenders with Rio 2016 Olympic Games gold medallist Catherine SKINNER (AUS) and Rio 2016 silver medallist Natalie ROONEY (NZL) missing the final.

Defending Glasgow 2014 champion, SCANLAN also went close to elimination, just making it through to the final as the last and sixth qualifier after a tense shoot-off with ROONEY.

SCANLAN, who had also made the final in Glasgow after a shoot-off, started the final session strongly, taking a lead in the first 10 targets then hitting all from 19 to 27 to increase the margin before clinching the gold medal with a Commonwealth Games record of 38.

Kirsty BARR (NIR) took silver with 37, her first Commonwealth Games medal at her third Games.

Top qualifier for the final, Sarah WIXEY (WAL), claimed bronze with 28. The Welsh shooter was second after the 30th target, but then four consecutive misses cost her a chance for the silver medal.

Commonwealth Games News Services


Retiring shooter Dan Repacholi has claimed the Hunter’s second gold medal of the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games after taking out the men’s 50 metre pistol event on Wednesday.

The 35-year-old, with his wife Alex and two daughters in the stands at the Belmont Shooting Centre, finished 6.7 points ahead of his nearest rival Bangladesh’s Shakil Ahmed (220.5). India’s Om Mitharval (201.1) was third.

“It’s amazing,” he told Channel 7 straight after the victory. “To win gold in front of my beautiful wife, my two beautiful kids and all our family it’s fantastic.”

Repacholi said the result could have been different without the home-crowd support.
“Definitely [you get something from them],” he said. “It was great, they were behind me the whole way. I don’t know if the same result would have happened if they weren’t here or if it was in another country.”

Earlier this week Repacholi was fourth in the final of the 10m air pistol, which he won in Glasgow in 2014, but bounced back for the longer-distance decider, “I continued to build and build and build throughout the final and just got better as it went,” he said. “That’s what you need to do in a final, unfortunately I didn’t get to do that in the last event two days ago but this time I have so it’s fantastic.”

The four-time Olympian now has six medals, featuring three gold, from four Commonwealth Games appearances starting in Melbourne 12 years ago.

Before the event he announced this would be his last international shoot.

Original article by Josh Callinan can be found here.